Bill Emerson National Hunger Fellows and Mickey Leland International Hunger Fellows Programs

The Bill Emerson Hunger Fellowship Program is to address hunger and poverty in the United States.

The Mickey Leland Hunger Fellowship Program is to address international hunger and other humanitarian needs.

The purposes of the Fellowships Programs are to: encourage future leaders of the
U.S.

to pursue careers in humanitarian and public service; recognize the needs of low-income people and hungry people; provide assistance to people in need; seek public policy solutions to the challenges of hunger and poverty; provide training and development opportunities for to such leaders through placement in programs operated by appropriate organizations or entities; and increase awareness of the importance of public service.
Examples of Funded Projects

Fiscal Year 2016: No Current Data Available Fiscal Year 2017: The 24th class of Emerson fellows will be working on a wide variety of projects, from conducting needs assessments to coalition-building, from supporting healthy corner stores to supporting new immigrant families learn how to grow their own food in an unfamiliar climate. The Leland fellows work on a variety of issues related to food security, including: agriculture, maternal and child nutrition, advocacy, climate change adaption, agribusiness development and women?s empowerment.

Fiscal Year 2018: No Current Data Available

Grants for this Program


Agency - Department of Agriculture

Established in 1862, the Department of Agriculture serves all Americans through anti-hunger efforts, stewardship of nearly 200 million acres of national forest and rangelands, and through product safety and conservation efforts. The USDA opens markets for American farmers and ranchers and provides food for needy people around the world.




Program Accomplishments

Fiscal Year 2016: The Bill Emerson National Hunger Fellows Program fellows are placed in community-based organizations all over the United States and receive extensive policy training. Fellows then work in nonprofit organizations and government agencies on hunger and poverty policies at the national level. The Mickey Leland International Hunger Fellows Program trains emerging leaders in the fight to end hunger worldwide. It is a unique two-year program that combines field and policy work. Leland Fellows develop new skills while actively working to alleviate hunger and poverty in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Fiscal Year 2017: The Bill Emerson National Hunger Fellows Program fellows are placed in community-based organizations all over the United States and receive extensive policy training. Fellows then work in nonprofit organizations and government agencies on hunger and poverty policies at the national level. On July 26, 2017, the CHC announced the 24th Class of Emerson National Hunger Fellows. The fellows will be placed with organizations in seven States plus the District of Columbia. There are 16 fellows in the current class. The Mickey Leland International Hunger Fellows Program trains emerging leaders in the fight to end hunger worldwide. It is a unique two-year program that combines field and policy work. Leland Fellows develop new skills while actively working to alleviate hunger and poverty in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. There are 12-15 individuals selected as fellows in each class. The 8th class will finish their fellowship August 30, 2017. Fiscal Year 2018: No Current Data Available

Uses and Use Restrictions

In accordance with the authorizing legislation and 2 CFR Part 2.19 and 2.57, the Administrator as delegated by the Secretary, is directed to offer a grant to the Congressional Hunger Center to administer these fellowship programs.

Funding is provided to the Congressional Hunger Center to train and inspire leaders who work to end hunger.

The Congressional Hunger Center is the grantee; they are provided funding to achieve the purposes of the Fellowship Programs as noted above.

The fellowships established shall provide experience and training to develop the skills and understanding necessary to improve the humanitarian conditions and the lives of individuals who suffer from hunger, including - (I) training in direct service to the hungry in conjunction with community-based organizations through a program or field placement; and (II) experience in policy development through placement in a governmental entity or nonprofit organization.

Funding is restricted to the costs related to selecting, training, and placement opportunities for individuals identified as a Hunger Fellow.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

N/A.

Beneficiary Eligibility

N/A.

Credentials/Documentation

No Credentials or documentation are required. This program is excluded from coverage under 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

Preapplication coordination is not applicable.

Environmental impact information is not required for this program.

This program is excluded from coverage under E.O.

12372.

Application Procedures

2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. n/a

Award Procedures

Applicant must meet the non-competitive grant submissions requirements for completeness and conformity in a grant application, project description and budget. FNS will determine the technical merit of the grant application, approve the proposal and then make a grant award.

Deadlines

Contact the headquarters or regional office, as appropriate, for application deadlines.

Authorization

Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008, Public Law 11-246, Section 4401, updated Section 4404 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002, Public Law 107-171. Annual Appropriations fund the Programs.; Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act 2013, Public Law 113-06, Section 4404 of Public Law 107-171, as amended by Section 4401 of Public Law 110-246(2. U.S.C. 1161); FY2012 Agriculture Appropriations Act, Public Law 112-55, Public Law 113-113-06, 2 U.S.C 1161; Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002, Public Law 107-171, Section 4404, Hunger Fellowship Program; Congressional Hunger Fellow Act of 2002, Public Law 107-107-171, 2 U.S.C 1161.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

From 30 to 60 days.

Appeals

Not Applicable.

Renewals

Not Applicable.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

This program has no statutory formula. This program has no matching requirements. This program does not have MOE requirements.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

The grant period of performance is generally for 15 months. Extensions to the period of performance must be approved by the FNS. Method of awarding/releasing assistance: by letter of credit.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

No program reports are required.

No cash reports are required.

The quarterly and final programmatic reports are required to be submitted by the grantee in accordance with the grant terms and conditions.

The quarterly and final financial reports, SF-425, are required to be submitted by the grantee in accordance with the grant terms and conditions.

Performance monitoring is not applicable.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503. The grantee is required to comply with the audit provisions in 2 CFR 200, Subpart F. There are no special audit procedures mandated for this grant program.

Records

The grantee must maintain records in accordance with the grant agreement. Such records must be retained for a period of 3 years after the date of submission of the final report for the fiscal year to which the records pertain, except if audit findings have not been resolved, the records shall be retained beyond the 3 year period as long as required for the resolution of the issues raised by the audit.

Financial Information

Account Identification

12-3508-0-1-605.

Obigations

(Salaries) FY 16 $2,000,000; FY 17 est $2,000,000; and FY 18 est $2,000,000

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

Congressional Hunger Center (CHC) $2,000,000 (non-competitive).

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

2 CFR Part 200, Uniform Guidance for Grants and Agreements. USDA appropriation language funding this grant program.

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

None.

Headquarters Office

Lael Lubing 3101 Park Center Drive Room 732, Alexandria, Virginia 22302 Email: lael.lubing@fns.usda.gov Phone: 703-305-2048

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

Not Applicable.



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