Tribal Wildlife Grants

To develop and implement programs for the benefit of wildlife and their habitat, including species that are not hunted or fished.




Related Programs

Examples of Funded Projects

Fiscal Year 2017: FY17 Tribal Wildlife Grants Award Examples: Passamaquoddy Tribe ? Indian Township Reservation ($200,000) Monitoring White-tailed Deer Migration, Survival and Mortality Characteristics from a Deer Wintering Area (DWA) on Passamaquoddy Reservation Land Tribal land DWA protects 200-400 white tail deer, and the Tribe harvest 20-60 deer/year.

The Tribe will collect data on deer movement and survival to understand why deer densities are low in and around tribal land.

Objectives include: 1) Track the migration corridors, distances traveled and timing of migrating deer to and from the Indian township DWA.

2) Identify important habitats for fawning, feeding and early wintering conditions.

3) Assess seasonal survival rates and cause specific mortality for the adult female (2: 1.5 years) segments of the population.

4) Assess feasibility of future fawn captures using clustered GPS locations.

Partners include: ME DIF&W, Penobscot Nation, Downeast Lakes Land Trust.

Aleut Community of St.

Paul Island Alaska ($99,265) Sustainable Reindeer Management on St.

Paul Island, Alaska St.

Paul Island is located in the middle of the Bering Sea.

Reindeer are an important subsistence food resource for tribal and community members on the island.

The goal of the project is to enhance reindeer management to ensure long-term sustainability and resiliency of the herd by 1) Understanding bull:cow ratios and recruitment rates via unmanned aircraft system surveys; 2) Collaborating with subsistence hunters to assess body condition, presence of disease and genetic testing; 3) Assessing grazing pressure and feasibility of temporary exclusion fencing to rehabilitate rangeland; and 4) Educating tribal and community members in responsible and ethical hunting practices via hunter education and implementing reindeer curriculum in schools.

In 2013, USDA's NRCS conducted a vegetation survey on St.

Paul and concluded the range can support a herd of no more than 200 reindeer.

As of October 2017, the herd was estimated at 400 reindeer.

The Tribal Ecosystem Conservation Office has managed a hunting permit and reporting system since 1996 and recently updated the Reindeer Management Plan to keep the herd size near 200 with a bull:cow ratio at 1:5.

Their plan is to manage a spring velvet season so hunters can identify male and barren female reindeer to harvest.

Pregnant females can be identified by their hard antlers and will not be harvested in order to sustain the herd into the future. Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe ($199,075) Mille Lacs Band Identifying Key Habitats for the Conservation of Juvenile and Adult Walleye in Mille Lacs Lake The research project will aid in the development of a management plan to restore walleye stocks in Mille Lacs Lake.

Recruitment of young walleye to the adult population has been limited in recent years and was identified as a high priority for future research efforts by a blue ribbon panel of university experts brought together to ponder the numerous biological issues that plague this world renowned lake.

To address this problem, and expand on previous research, the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe along with Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission, U.S.

Fish and Wildlife Service, and Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, proposed a telemetry study to track both juvenile and adult walleye life stages in the summer and fall of 2018.

Project objectives include: 1) assess the thermal niche of juvenile and adult walleye across seasons, 2) identify aquatic habitats that are key for adult and juvenile life stages, and 3) identify temporal, spatial, and thermal overlap of juvenile and adult habitats. FY 2017 Tribal Wildlife Grants Awards: ALASKA: St.

Paul Island ($99,265) Sustainable Reindeer Management on St.

Paul Island, Alaska Sun'aq Tribe of Kodiak ($198,764) Distribution, Movement and Diet of Invasive Crayfish Populations in Buskin River Watershed on Kodiak Island, Alaska Sitka Tribe of Alaska ($200,000) Shellfish Population and Habitat Research in Southeast Alaska ARIZONA: Cocopah Tribe ($82,000) Colorado River Habitat Enhancement Project CALIFORNIA: Pit River Tribe ($199,092) The XL Reservation Great Basin Native Sage-Steppe, Grassland and Wildlife Habitat Restoration Monitoring Program Robinson Rancheria ($140,300) Robinson Creek Restoration and HAMP Update Cachil Dehe Band of Wintun Indians ($190,950) Cortina Ranch Tule Elk Habitat Restoration -Phase 2 Wiyot Tribe ($200,000) Long Term Monitoring Plan Implementation, Invasive Predator Control, and Barrier Remediation Kashia Band of Pomo Indians ($199,059) Kashia?s Wildlife Management FLORIDA: Seminole Tribe of Florida ($200,000) Seminole Tribe of Florida Tribal Wildlife Program KANSAS: Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska ($162,127) A Fish Community Assessment in Streams with Focus on Rare Species MAINE: Passamaquoddy Tribe ? Indian Township Reservation ($200,000) Monitoring White-tailed Deer Migration, Survival and Mortality Characteristics from a Deer Wintering Area (DWA) on Passamaquoddy Reservation Land Penobscot Indian Nation ($200,000) Atlantic Salmon and Diadromous Fisheries Management on Tribal Trust Lands MICHEGAN: Sault Ste.

Marie Tribe ($196,321) Developing an Adaptive Management Process for Ruffed Grouse in the 1836 Ceded Territory MINNESOTA: Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe ($199,075) Mille Lacs Band Identifying Key Habitats for the Conservation of Juvenile and Adult Walleye in Mille Lacs Lake MONTANA: Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (81,235) Grizzly Bear and Northern Gray Wolf Conflict Management on the Flathead Indian Reservation NEW MEXICO: Pueblo of Tesuque ($199,754) Mule Deer Management and Habitat Enhancement Program NORTH CAROLINA: Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians ($200,000) Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Wildlife Action Plan Implementation (FY18-19) OKLAHOMA: Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma ($155,000) Tonkawa Tribal Bat Conservation Project OREGON: Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon ($123,609) Fox Creek Habitat Restoration Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians ($189,887) Dole Road Elk Population Dynamics and Habitat Utilization Study WASHINGTON: Kalispell Tribes of Indians ($96,081) South Selkirk Mountain Caribou Maternal Penning Project Puyallup Tribe of Indians ($199,592) South Rainier Elk Herd Habitat Enhancement and Population Monitoring Snoqualmie Indian Tribe ($200,000) Priority Habitat Restoration Actions for Lake Sammamish Native Kokanee Skokomish Indian Tribe ($142,524) Cougar Population and Predation Effects on Elk in the Southeast Olympic Peninsula.

Fiscal Year 2018: Program has not yet selected projects for funding.

Program anticipates funding projects that develop or implement programs that benefit wildlife and their habitat, including species of Native American cultural or traditional importance and species that are not hunted or fished.

Activities may include, but are not limited to: Planning for conservation of fish and wildlife, and their habitats; Conservation management actions for fish and wildlife, and their habitats; Field and laboratory research related to fish and wildlife resources; Natural history studies; Habitat mapping or evaluation; Field surveys and population monitoring; Conservation easements; Restoration of habitat; Management of invasive species; and Public education relevant to the proposed project.

Fiscal Year 2019: Program has not yet selected projects for funding.

Program anticipates funding projects that develop or implement programs that benefit wildlife and their habitat, including species of Native American cultural or traditional importance and species that are not hunted or fished.

Activities may include, but are not limited to: Planning for conservation of fish and wildlife, and their habitats; Conservation management actions for fish and wildlife, and their habitats; Field and laboratory research related to fish and wildlife resources; Natural history studies; Habitat mapping or evaluation; Field surveys and population monitoring; Conservation easements; Restoration of habitat; Management of invasive species; and Public education relevant to the proposed project.


Agency - Department of the Interior

The Department of the Interior protects and provides access to the Nation's natural and cultural heritage, including responsibilities to Indian tribes and island communities. Departmental goals include resource protection and usage, overseeing recreational opportunities, serving communities and excellence in management.

Office - See Regional Agency Offices.

See Regional Agency Offices: Region 1 U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison Eastside Federal Complex 911 NE 11th Avenue Portland, OR 97232-4181 Region 2 Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison 500 Gold Avenue, SW P.O.

Box 1306 Albuquerque, NM 87103-1306 Region 3 U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison 5600 American Blvd.

West, Suite 990 Bloomington, MN 55437 Region 4 U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison 1875 Century Boulevard Atlanta, GA 30345 Region 5 U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison 300 Westgate Center Drive, Hadley, MA 01035-9589 Region 6 U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison P.O.

Box 25486 Denver, CO 80225 Region 7 U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison 1011 East Tudor Road Anchorage, AK 99503-6199 Region 8 U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Tribal Partnerships Specialist Habitat Restoration Division 2800 Cottage Way, Rm W-2606 Sacramento, CA 95825.



Selected Recipients for this Program


RecipientAmount Start DateEnd Date
Lower Brule Sioux Tribe $ 199,999   2019-01-012022-12-31
Eastern Shoshone Tribe $ 108,030   2018-12-112022-09-30
Samish Indian Nation $ 200,000   2019-01-012022-09-30
Grand Portage Reservation Tribal Council $ 199,718   2018-12-012022-05-30
Klamath Tribes, The $ 189,692   2018-05-212022-05-21
Native Village Of Eyak $ 200,000   2019-01-012021-12-31
St. Regis Mohawk Education And Community Fund, Inc. $ 199,998   2018-09-012021-12-31
Santa Ana, Pueblo Of $ 199,949   2018-11-012021-11-01
Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe $ 199,887   2018-09-012021-08-31
Snoqualmie Indian Tribe $ 200,000   2017-07-242020-12-31



Program Accomplishments

Fiscal Year 2017: 74 proposals were received; 25 awards issued. Fiscal Year 2018: Estimated between 74-130 proposals are expected; 20-30 awards expected to be issued. Fiscal Year 2019: Estimated between 74-130 proposals are expected; 20-30 awards expected to be issued.

Uses and Use Restrictions

Approved activities include those which develop and implement programs for the benefit of wildlife and their habitat, including species of Native American cultural or traditional importance and species that are not hunted or fished.

Activities may include, but are not limited to: Planning for conservation of fish and wildlife, and their habitats; Conservation management actions for fish and wildlife, and their habitats; Field and laboratory research related to fish and wildlife resources; Natural history studies; Habitat mapping or evaluation; Field surveys and population monitoring; Restoration of habitat; Management of invasive species; and Public education relevant to the proposed project.

Yes, 100% of the funds are discretionary.

Eligibility Requirements

Applicant Eligibility

Participation is limited to Federally recognized Indian tribal governments.

Beneficiary Eligibility

Anyone/General Public (While direct participation is limited to Federally recognized Indian tribal governments, the general public will ultimately benefit from these wildlife conservation measures).

Credentials/Documentation

Only Federally recognized Tribes in all parts of the United States are eligible to receive grants under this program, including Federally recognized Tribes, Pueblos, Rancherias, and Alaska Native Villages or traditional councils as defined by the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. Federally recognized Tribes are listed on page 60810 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 190 / Friday, October 1, 2010 / Notices. OMB Circular No. A-87 applies to this program. 2 CFR 200, Subpart E - Cost Principles applies to this program.

Aplication and Award Process

Preapplication Coordination

Preapplication coordination is not applicable.

Environmental impact information is not required for this program.

This program is excluded from coverage under E.O.

12372.

Application Procedures

2 CFR 200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards applies to this program. Applicant must complete the Application for Federal Assistance SF 424, and the appropriate Budget and Assurances forms, SF 424A and SF424B - Non Construction; or SF 424C and SF 424 D - Construction. Application procedures are spelled out in the 'Tribal Wildlife Grant Application Kit' available electronically at: http://grants.fws.gov/tribal.html. To receive a paper copy, contact the regional Office of the Native American Liaison.

Award Procedures

The Director of the Fish and Wildlife Service or his or her designee approves or disapproves proposed projects. Regional offices are responsible for notification of grant approval to the grantee and will coordinate the development of the grant agreement.

Deadlines

May 01, 2018 to Sep 04, 2018 May 1, 2018 to Sep 4, 2018.

Authorization

Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, Pub. L. 115-123; Consolidated Appropriations Act FY 2017 P.L. 114-113; and prior appropriations acts., Public Law 108-108, 16 U.S.C 4601-4 thru 11.

Range of Approval/Disapproval Time

Proposals will be scored, ranked and selected approximately 90 working days after the deadline for submitting proposals.

Appeals

Any differences of opinion over the eligibility of proposed activities or differences arising over the conduct of work may be appealed to the Director, Fish and Wildlife Service. Final determination rests with the Secretary of the Interior.

Renewals

Not Applicable.

Assistance Considerations

Formula and Matching Requirements

Statutory formulas are not applicable to this program. This program has no matching requirements. There is no matching requirement, however, the Service will consider matching funds as an indication of tribal commitment to the program and to encourage partnerships. Matching and cost sharing requirements are discussed in 43 CFR Part 12, Section 12.64. MOE requirements are not applicable to this program.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance

Apportioned funds are available for obligation by the Tribe until expended. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Funds are disbursed to recipients as requested and in accordance with 2 CFR 200, Subpart E-Cost Principles, otherwise prescribed in program-specific legislation or special award terms. Program will include any special payment terms and conditions in the notice of award.

Post Assistance Requirements

Reports

Program reports are not applicable.

Cash reports are not applicable.

A Performance Report is required for each grant annually within 90 days after the anniversary date or end of the grant.

A Federal Financial Report SF 425 is required for each grant annually within 90 days after the anniversary date or end of the grant.

Recipients are responsible for monitoring and reporting performance for each award and sub-award under this program in accordance with 2 CFR 200 and 2 CFR Part 170.

Audits

In accordance with the provisions of 2 CFR 200, Subpart F - Audit Requirements, non-Federal entities that expend financial assistance of $750,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Non-Federal entities that expend less than $750,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in 2 CFR 200.503.

Records

Cost records must be maintained separately for each project. Records, accounts, and supporting documents must be retained for three years after submission of the final Federal Financial Report (SF-425).

Financial Information

Account Identification

14-5474-0-1-302.

Obigations

(Project Grants (Discretionary)) FY 17 $4,414,427; FY 18 est $4,084,000; and FY 19 est $4,084,000 - Project Grants (Discretionary): FY17 $4,084,000 (actual = $4,414,427 ? Included previous fiscal year carryover and recoveries); FY18 est. $4,084,000; FY19 est. $4,084,000 FY18 and FY19 estimates are subject to the President?s Budget.

Range and Average of Financial Assistance

Range $0 - $200,000; Average $167,000.

Regulations, Guidelines, and Literature

Application Kit is located at http://www.fws.gov/nativeamerican/

Information Contacts

Regional or Local Office

See Regional Agency Offices. See Regional Agency Offices: Region 1 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison Eastside Federal Complex 911 NE 11th Avenue Portland, OR 97232-4181 Region 2 Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison 500 Gold Avenue, SW P.O. Box 1306 Albuquerque, NM 87103-1306 Region 3 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison 5600 American Blvd. West, Suite 990 Bloomington, MN 55437 Region 4 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison 1875 Century Boulevard Atlanta, GA 30345 Region 5 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison 300 Westgate Center Drive, Hadley, MA 01035-9589 Region 6 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison P.O. Box 25486 Denver, CO 80225 Region 7 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American Liaison 1011 East Tudor Road Anchorage, AK 99503-6199 Region 8 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Tribal Partnerships Specialist Habitat Restoration Division 2800 Cottage Way, Rm W-2606 Sacramento, CA 95825.

Headquarters Office

Scott Aikin National Native American Programs Coordinator, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior, 1211 SE Cardinal Court, Suite 100, , Vancouver, Washington 98683 Phone: (360)604-2531 Fax: (360)604-2505

Criteria for Selecting Proposals

The following criteria is used to select proposals: (1) Resource Benefit: What are the expected benefits to fish and wildlife resources, including species that are not hunted or fished, and their habitat if this program is successfully completed? The Service requires that the Tribe articulate how the benefits of its proposal support the goals and objectives of the TWG and Service and Tribal Performance Goals in their proposal narratives. (2) Performance Measures: To what extent does the proposal provide obtainable and quantifiable performance measures and a means to monitor, evaluate, and report on these measures compared to an initial baseline? The measures should be specific and clear, and should provide demonstrable benefits to the target species of the action. These actions must support the goals and objectives of the TWG, the Service and the Tribe. (3) Work plan: Are the program activities and objectives well-designed and achievable? (4) Budget: Are all major budget items justified in relation to the program objectives and clearly explained in the narrative description? (5) Capacity Building: To what extent does the program increase the grantee's capacity to provide for the benefit of wildlife and their habitat? (6) Contributions and Partnerships: To what extent does the applicant display commitment to the project proposal through in-kind contribution or matching funds and to what extent does it incorporate contributions from other nonfederal partners in the form of either cash or in-kind services?.




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